Nature

Be a Pansy

pansiesIn the spring, I pass a group of planters by my office that are full of pansies. They are bright, cheerful and resilient. It snows, sleets, rains, and freezes, yet the pansies come back again and again.

pansiesI’ll pass them in the morning and they are wilted and faltering under the ice and frost. By the evening when I leave, they are standing tall, worshipping the sun, and beaming happiness and vitality to all. Sometimes a cold snap will knock them back for a couple of days, but they always come back. I have great admiration for these plants; they are strong and determined to shine.

yellow pansiesWhen I look at them just right, I can see an energetic glow projected around them. I like to think of this as their song that they sing to the world, encouraging others to make it through their obstacles and stand tall.

purple pansiesWhen spring turns to summer and the heat gets turned up, there will be a day – it happens every year – when I come to work and the pansies are gone. The landscapers have ripped them out and replaced them with sun-hardy plants. Every year, I feel like I was gut-kicked as I think of my plant friends being ripped out by the roots and trashed before they were naturally ready to go. It hurts. But the next, I again admire the new group that gets planted. I can’t help it. Their cheerful colors and beautiful song suck me in every time. If they keep showing up for me, I’ll keep sending my gratitude and admiration to them. 

planter of pansies

Pansies help more than just the people. I’ve seen birds and squirrels take a grateful drink of water from the water tray at the bottom.

They are a wonderful inspiration, encouraging us all to have a pansy way of life!

pansies

18 replies »

  1. This is wonderful. Nature has all these ways of inspiring us, of teaching us a path different from the materialistic, power-hungry, self-indulgent slump of arrogance we’ve fallen into as a society (as a species)… If only we care to look—and see. Yes, it would break my heart to see the pansies ripped out, too… I’m glad you can move forward and enjoy the next plantings, too, though.

    Thanks so much for coming by Vidya’s lovely blog for my guest post; really happy to connect with a fellow lover of furry, four-legged friends. I love your blog, and I’ll be back often.
    Guilie @ Life In Dogs

    Liked by 1 person

      • Your book looked so good and seemed to resonate with my own point of view. Unfortunately, I really dislike ebooks and just read paper books. I’ve bought several but never read them because it hurts my eyes. I didn’t see an option to buy a paper copy of your book. I liked your blog too, but I was not allowed to comment on Blogspot and all my blogging is on WordPress. I really began to feel like tech was working against me here. I finally gave up and moved on. Thanks for connecting with me. When I have time and energy, maybe I can figure out how to get a Blogspot account without posting a blog there. (*throwing hands up in frustration *)

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I love pansies and their little faces too. I grew up in PA where we planted them in the spring and they lasted all summer long. I was shocked to find out it was just the opposite here in the south. I have many fond memories of helping my aunt plant pansies in her flower garden. (I don’t like gardening but I love being outside and I loved my aunt.)

    Liked by 2 people

    • We live significantly west and south, and the summers here are too severe for them to live so summer. I’ll bet they were beautiful all summer long. It sounds like you had a special relationship with your aunt! Very fortunate!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Yes, I was the only child in a family of 3 women, and my Nan Nan (her name was Anna May, but I started out calling her that, and it stuck) spent so much time with me, playing and teaching me everything.

        Liked by 2 people

    • I don’t plant them either- Spring is so short and summer is long. So I plant summer things. But I enjoy the ones that I see even more because they are a rare treat!

      Liked by 2 people

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